When Workingmen Shook the World - the 1886 NYC Mayor's Race
Seminar"/>

When Workingmen Shook the World – the 1886 NYC Mayor’s Race
Seminar

2020-12-21 6:30 pm - 2021-01-21 8:00 pm
Henry George School of Social Science
Phone:(212) 889-8020
Address: 149 East 38th Street, New York, NY 10016

When Workingmen Shook the World – the 1886 NYC Mayor’s Race

Mon, December 21, 2020 | 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EST

In this webinar, Dr. Marty Rowland will present an in-depth look at the 1886 NYC Mayor’s race which featured Henry George as the workingman’s candidate versus Congressman and social elite/politically connected Abram S. Hewitt.  Three levels of analysis will be explored:

a) Institutional and 19th century corrupt practices of NYC politics that roadblocked the possibility of George’s win;

b) How hopes of a NYS and National Labor Party were dashed in the 12 months following the 1886 election; and

c) Lessons still relevant for advancing George’s Single Tax within today’s socially progressive movement.

Dr. Rowland is a Henry George scholar and Trustee of the HGSSS, a licensed professional environmental engineer, natural resource economist in the tradition of George-Ostrom-Bromley-Raworth.

 

A link to join the online seminar will be provided via email before the start of the webinar.

Code of Conduct

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    Code of Conduct