Inequalities and the Progressive Era - Breakthroughs and Legacies
Seminar"/>

Inequalities and the Progressive Era – Breakthroughs and Legacies
Seminar

INEQUALITIES AND THE PROGRESSIVE ERA – BREAKTHROUGHS AND LEGACIES

11:30 AM | Friday, November 13th

Join us for an interactive book presentation webinar on the Progressive Era.

In this special webinar, Professor Guillaume Vallet will introduce his newly published work “Inequalities and the Progressive Era – Breakthroughs and Legacies”, featuring contributions from many authors, each exploring a facet of inequality during the ‘Progressive Era’ (1890s-1930s). Though it is most associated with the United States, the “Progressive Era” corresponds to a vibrant historical period in which profound changes and progress were achieved or expected all over the world.

Speaker

Guillaume Vallet is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Grenoble Alpes, and Research Fellow at the Centre de Recherche en Économie de Grenoble (CREG) and the Institut de Recherche pour l’Economie Politique de l’Entreprise (IREPE), France. Guillaume is also a researcher at the Geneva based Institute of Sociological Research (ISR).

You can purchase a copy of Guillaume’s book on ElgaronlineAmazon, and Google Play

A link to join the online seminar will be provided via email before the start of the session.

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  • 2021-06-17 11:00 am - 2021-06-17 12:30 pm

    MONETARY POLICY, ASSET INFLATION AND INEQUALITY

    Thu, June 17, 2021 | 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT


    In this webinar, Pr. Louis Philippe Rochon takes a fresh look at the links between monetary policy, asset bubbles and inequality.

    It is often argued that asset inflation and real estate bubbles are the result of accommodative monetary policy: low interest rates encourages borrowing for speculative purposes.

    Undoubtedly, this has been the case as an increasing part of borrowing is not meant for productive purposes.

    In this webinar, Prof. Rochon will argue that this is a misreading of the facts. Rather than laying the blame at the feet of low interest rates, bubbles may be caused by growing inequality as well as by the excessive deregulation.

    Learn why governments need to re-regulate borrowing and, introduce such policies as financial transaction taxes to prevent asset inflation and specifically real estate bubbles.

    A link to join the online seminar will be provided via email before the start of the webinar.

    Code of Conduct