Episode 111: The Political Economy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (2023)

Today's discussion came from our archives and was recorded in January of 2023. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, a long-time faculty member here at the Henry George School.

To celebrate Black History Month, we wanted to pause our regular content and give our listeners a special series on the political economy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. For the next two episodes, we’ll continue our 3-part series exploring Dr. King’s intellectual evolution and how it impacted his solutions to addressing poverty.

Mr. Dodson attended Shippensburg University and Temple University where he received an economics degree. Ed worked for Fannie Mae, a public-private partnership to help distribute home mortgage loans. During his time at Fannie Mae, Mr. Dodson held numerous management and analyst positions within the Housing & Community Development group, helping revitalize neighborhoods and local communities. This gives him an interesting perspective on land use and reform, and how it can reduce inequality. He also has extensive experience as a history lecturer at the Osher Life Long Learning Institute and the Learning is For Everyone program at Burlington County College. Edward has written many papers on history and the political economy and is the author of a three-volume book series titled "The Discovery of First Principles."

Episode 110: The Political Economy of Martin Luther King, Jr. (2022)

Today's discussion came from our archives and was recorded in January of 2022. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, a long-time faculty member here at the Henry George School.

To celebrate Black History Month, we wanted to pause our regular content and give our listeners a special series on the political economy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.. For the next few episodes, we’ll have a 3-part series exploring Dr. King’s intellectual evolution, and how it impacted his solutions to addressing poverty.

Mr. Dodson attended Shippensburg University and Temple University where he received an economics degree. Ed worked for Fannie Mae, a public-private partnership to help distribute home mortgage loans. During his time at Fannie Mae, Mr. Dodson held numerous management and analyst positions within the Housing & Community Development group, helping revitalize neighborhoods and local communities. This gives him an interesting perspective on land use and reform, and how it can reduce inequality. He also has extensive experience as a history lecturer at the Osher Life Long Learning Institute and the Learning is For Everyone program at Burlington County College. Edward has written many papers on history and the political economy and is the author of a three-volume book series titled "The Discovery of First Principles."

Episode 109: Quantitative easing and inequality

Today's discussion was recorded in July of 2021. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, a long-time faculty member here at the Henry George School, who is joined by our guest Dr. Raphaële Chappe.

Dr. Chappe is a Decentralized Finance economist and Director of R&D and Strategy at DeVol Network, a cryptocurrency platform. Dr. Chappe is also an economic advisor for The Predistribution Initiative, a non-profit that supports creating investment structures that better distributes wealth with workers and communities. Dr. Chappe is also a Research Fellow with the Open Society Foundation. Dr. Chappe earned her bachelor’s in Law and French Law from King’s College London, a master’s degree in Comparative Business Law from the University of Pantheon-Sorbonne in Paris, a master’s in law from New York University, and her doctorate in economics from The New School for Social Research. Needless to say, she has quite an extensive resume. Raphaële’s research interests include monetary policy and shadow banking.

We were lucky enough to talk to Dr. Chappe about quantitative easing, how it impacts inequality, and how recent accumulations of debt could impact the global macroeconomy.

Episode 108: How populism can improve democratic institutions

Today's discussion was recorded in December of 2023. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, a long-time faculty member here at the Henry George School, who is joined by our guest Dr. Walter Horn.

Dr. Horn is a philosopher who uses his philosophical training to analyze public policy. Writing for journals such as The Journal of Philosophy and Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Walter has published many articles on topics such as metaphysics, epistemology, or the psychology of religion. He is also the author of "Democratic Theory Naturalized," which deeply examines populism and power relations within a democracy. As a professor, Dr. Horn has taught at Brown University and Framingham State University. When he’s not busy writing about psychology or philosophy, our guest loves to write and analyze music and has several recorded albums.

To improve our system of government and create outcomes more beneficial to the public, Dr. Horn believes society needs a healthy dose of populism. Populism is a complex idea, usually harboring negative connotations from both the left and right. But to Dr. Horn, populism is a move toward radical democracy and the empowerment of people. Governments, democracies, and constitutions all change over time. But what these changes are, and who they impact, have lasting consequences on how we organize our society and decide who gets to make what decisions.

Dr. Horn earned his bachelor’s degree from Ithaca College, and his Ph.D. from Brown University, both in philosophy.

Together, we discussed Dr. Horn’s definition of populism, how democratic reform can empower citizens, and why education is so important to achieving democratic outcomes.

Episode 107: A lesson on sustainable macroeconomics

Today's discussion came from our archives and was recorded in October of 2023. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, a long-time faculty member here at the Henry George School, who is joined by our guest Dr. Willi Semmler.

Dr. Semmler is the Arnhold Professor of International Cooperation and Development at the New School in New York City, where he researches macroeconomics, the economics of climate change, and financial markets. Dr. Semmler is also a Fellow at Columbia University’s Center on Capitalism and Society, an institute that examines the shortcomings of orthodox economics and looks to understand the economy through a more realistic and complex lens. Willi has also taught at other universities such as the American University in Washington D.C., the University of Berlin, and the University of Bielefeld in Germany. He is the author of numerous journal articles and has written many books such as "Asset Prices, Booms, and Recessions" and "Sustainable Macroeconomics, Climate Risks, and Energy Transitions." Dr. Semmler is a trustee and long-time member here at the Henry George School. He is an expert on all things macroeconomics, sustainability, and business cycles.

Today’s discussion delves into how economics can be used, or rethought, to improve environmental conditions. Is economic growth inseparable from environmental damage? Can the economy become less energy-intensive as it diversifies? Is it possible to improve living conditions with a growing population without causing pollution? Economists often examine incentives, and how they can lead to different outcomes. Dr. Semmler helps us break down these incentives, and how they can be recalibrated to benefit conservation efforts.

Dr. Semmler studied at the University of Munich and Technical University in Germany and earned his PhD from the Free University of Berlin.

Together we discussed why many conflate economic growth with pollution, how policy and incentives can better serve environmental needs, and how the financial sector can be rewired to encourage productive investment and reduce speculation.

Episode 106: A system dynamics approach to Georgism

Today's discussion came from our archives and was recorded in July of 2023. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, a long-time faculty member here at the Henry George School, who is joined by our guest Mr. Lars Doucet.

Mr. Doucet is a consultant, blogger, entrepreneur, game developer, and currently the Director of Outreach for Common Ground USA. As a consultant, Lars has been accredited with developing numerous video games and software packages, such as Defender’s Quest and Super Energy Apocalypse. He is also the founder of Geo Land Solutions, which appraises large tracts of land to better calibrate land values and taxes more equitably. Mr. Doucet recently published his first book: "Land is a Big Deal," where he explores Georgist ideas, such as rent, natural resource extraction, and collectivism.

Mr. Doucet earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University in Visual Sciences.

Together, we discussed how Mr. Doucet came to his Georgist epiphany, how speculation leads to inequality and economic downturns, and how proper appraisal of land values can lead to beneficial downstream effects.

Episode 105: Getting into the weeds of housing markets

Today's discussion came from our archives and was recorded in June of 2023. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, a long-time faculty member here at the Henry George School, who is joined by our returning guest Mr. Mark Mollineaux.

Mark is an artist, radio host, and researcher who focuses on metropolitan resilience, urbanization, and housing affordability. Mr. Mollineaux is a lifelong Georgist and hosts a popular radio show, ⁠"The Henry George Program⁠," on Stanford’s radio where he hosts discussions on Georgist ideas and concepts. He is also part of Common Ground USA’s California Chapter. Common Ground USA promotes land and economic justice through land-value taxation, land trusts, and fair taxation of pollution or extraction.

Together, we got into the weeds of the dynamics of housing markets, discussed why traditional policy tools won’t help current unaffordability problems and why some alternatives may be better, and why property and land taxes can help entrench unaffordability.

Episode 104: Creating cities for transformative development

Mr. Morial is the former mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana, and current President and CEO of the National Urban League. The National Urban League is a civil rights group that promotes equality, social justice, and economic empowerment. The National Urban League spearheads social programs, public policy research, and advocacy efforts in over 300 communities across the U.S. to shrink the wealth gap in underserved communities. Through a combination of education, entrepreneurship, and job training, the National Urban League looks to create self-reliance and reinvigorate small- and medium-sized cities.

Our guest today spoke not just of the importance of cities, but how we can make them better places to develop better standards of living for everyone.

Mr. Morial earned his bachelor’s degree in African American Studies and Economics from the University of Pennsylvania and his JD from Georgetown University.

Together, we discussed how living conditions in New Orleans changed since Mr. Morial’s mayorship, how many cities across the US face similar deterioration, and how the country can produce transformative development for future generations.

Episode 103: Henry George's influence on American liberalism

Today's discussion came from our archives and was recorded in April of 2023. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, who is joined by our guest, Dr. Christopher England.

Dr. England is an Adjunct Lecturer at Georgetown University, and has also taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Loyola University, Maryland, and Stanford University. His courses focus on US history, the history of economic thought, political media, and social movements in America. His most recent book, Henry George and the Crafting of Modern Liberalism, focuses on the influence Henry George had on American politics and public sentiment towards policy. Examining firsthand accounts of George’s correspondences with his followers, Dr. England traces the legacy of George’s influence from the Progressive Movement to the New Deal Era. With a particular focus on land, natural resources, and rent-seeking, Dr. England observes how Georgism influenced public policy during these times to create a more egalitarian and democratic society.

Dr. England received his bachelor’s degree in history and rhetoric from UC Berkeley and his Ph.D. from Georgetown in history. He’s also a former Fellow at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

Dr. England joined the Henry George School to discuss land reforms during the New Deal, how George transformed liberalism in the US and around the world, and how land and land markets impact economic and social crises.

Episode 102: ESG Concerns in Ukraine's reconstruction

Today's discussion came from our archives and was recorded in November of 2023. Our talk is hosted by our Director of Education, Ibrahima Drame, who is joined our guest, Dr. Nataliia Bychkova.

Dr. Bychkova is currently a Karl Loewenstein Fellow at Amherst College, where she is also an associate professor of Political Science. She is also a visiting professor at the University of Bologna, in Italy, and Odesa Mechnykov National University, in Ukraine. Dr. Bychkova has also held positions at Odesa National Economic University and Kyiv National Economics University. She has written numerous books and journal articles on topics such as corporate governance, ESG, and economic development and transitions.

Dr. Bychkova received her bachelor’s degree and Ph.D from Odessa Mechnikov National University, both in economics.

Together, we discussed the war’s impact on educational outcomes and human capital, what post-war recovery efforts should look like, and some of the ESG concerns pre-war, and how to address them during reconstruction.

Episode 101: Congestion Pricing - Lessons from London’s Decade Long Experience

Today's discussion came from our archives and was recorded in February of 2023. Our talk is hosted by Ed Dodson, who joined our guest, Mr. Dave Wetzel.

Dave Wetzel has had a long career in transportation, working as a bus conductor and official in the 1960s. Shortly after, Mr. Wetzel became a political organizer of the London Co-operative Society between 1974 and 1981. He was elected as a Labour member for Hammersmith and Fulham on the Greater London Council in 1981 and served as the Chair of the Transport Committee. Mr. Wetzel also served on Hounslow Borough Council, acting as the leader in the late 80s and early 90s. Dave was Vice Chair of Transport for London between 2000 and 2008 and Chair of London Buses from 2000 to 2001.

Mr. Wetzel was educated at Southall Technical College, Ealing College, and at the Henry George School of Social Science.

Together, we discussed how Mr. Wetzel’s experience impacted his time as a transportation leader, the implications of Russian imperialism and their conflict with Ukraine, and got into the weeds of London’s transportation policy.

Episode 100: 100th Episode Special on Henry George

To celebrate our 100th episode, we wanted to do a special podcast on Henry George and Georgism. It was recorded in November of 2023 by Nathan Greene, a researcher at the Henry George School, and Ed Dodson, a long-time faculty member.

Ed is an expert on Henry George and all things Georgism. As a long-time subscriber of George, land value taxation, and land use reform, he is the perfect person to talk to for our centennial episode.

Mr. Dodson attended Shippensburg University and Temple University where he received an economics degree. Ed worked for Fannie Mae, a public-private partnership to help distribute home mortgage loans. During his time at Fannie Mae, Mr. Dodson held numerous management and analyst positions within the Housing & Community Development group, helping revitalize neighborhoods and local communities. This gives him an interesting perspective on land use and reform, and how it can reduce inequality. He also has extensive experience as a history lecturer at the Osher Life Long Learning Institute and the Learning is For Everyone program at Burlington County College. Edward has written many papers on history and the political economy and is the author of a three-volume book series titled The Discovery of First Principles.

Together, we discussed Henry George in the context of economic history, his ideas, and how the Georgist community can turn back into a movement.

Episode 99: In Quest of a Multipolar World Order – Promises and Perils

Today, our discussion comes from our archived seminar: ⁠In Quest of a Multipolar Economic World Order – Promises and Perils⁠, which was recorded in March of 2021. Our talk is hosted by our Director of Education, Dr. Ibrahima Drame, and Alana Hartzok, an environmental activist and ethicist. For our talk today we’re joined by Dr. Michael Hudson and Mr. Pepe Escobar.

Dr. Hudson is the president of the Institute for the Study of Long Term Economic Trends, and a professor of economics at the University of Missouri–Kansas City as well as the School of Marxist Studies at Peking University, in China.

Mr. Escobar is a Brazilian journalist with extensive experience in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. He is the author of several books on globalization: Globalistan, Empire of Chaos, and many more.

With the decline of the US, questions about the global order it established are beginning to arise. Some believe that the very hegemonic status itself was the cause of many global ills. Within this criticism lies the desire for a multipolar world, or one that has many leaders, not just one. However, history has shown that challenges to established orders or incumbent hegemons can lead to tumultuous times. Our guests today help us understand how things could play out in the coming decades. Will this be an opportunity to fix unaddressed concerns or another flashpoint for conflict? Looking at the world through geopolitical and economic lens, we can answer some of these questions.

Dr. Hudson is a consultant to governments across the world for nations like Latvia, China, and Iceland. Pepe is the editor-at-large for Asia Times and is a veteran geopolitical analyst. These two are seasoned geopolitical commentators and are the perfect guests to answer some of our questions.

Together, we discussed how imperialistic tendencies led to problematic behavior by the US, why China developed so rapidly while the US stagnated, and why South American countries pursued neoliberal policies in the 70s and 80s.

Episode 98: A hard look at rent and rent-seeking

Today, our discussion comes from our archived seminar: ⁠"A Hard Look at Rent and Rent Seeking⁠," recorded in December 2020. Our Talk is hosted by our Director of Education, Ibrahima Drame, who is joined by Dr. Michael Hudson and Mr. Pepe Escobar. Our talk today was jointly hosted by the Henry George School and the ⁠International Union for Land Value Taxation⁠.

Dr. Hudson is the president of the Institute for the Study of Long Term Economic Trends, and professor of economics at the University of Missouri–Kansas City and the School of Marxist Studies at Peking University, in China. He is a consultant to governments across the world for nations like Latvia, China, and Iceland.

Mr. Escobar is a Brazilian journalist with extensive experience in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. He is the author of several books on globalization: "Globalistan," "Empire of Chaos," and many more. He is the editor-at-large for Asia Times and is a veteran geopolitical analyst.

When economists try to determine what fairness looks like in the economy, they will often view this through rent, or rent-seeking behavior. When most people hear rent, they think of their monthly payment to their landlord. While this is a useful comparison, when economists use the term “rent” it means something a little different. In economics, rent is referred to as a payment or income earned that is more than what is required to keep a resource or factor of production in its current use. Usually, when rent-seeking occurs, there is an element of exploitation or asymmetric balance of power.

Rent-seeking doesn’t just occur between individuals, or employers and employees. It can also exist between countries, or within systems. Rent can help explain why the US economy has become so unequal, and why China is developing so rapidly. Is it possible for America to reindustrialize? Has corporate power and financialization created a vicious cycle of inequality? Has China’s government and financial system gained an advantage as the US’s has stagnated. Our guests today hope to answer these questions and provide insights into how rent-seeking impacts macroeconomic trends.

Together, we discussed how the US lost its competitive edge, how China ascended at such a rapid rate, and why an over-reliance on financialization tends to lead to inequality.

Episode 97: Development trends in Central Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union states

Often when we talk about competition between two nations, the US and China is the perfect example for today, we get arguments that are boiled down to broad ideas; like East vs the West and capitalism vs communism. But when we do this, we often lose a lot of nuance and miss some important details.

Not too long ago, the US and the West were competing with the USSR and pooled their resources towards containing the spread of communism. Fast forward to now and some of the satellite states and former Soviet Union nations have turned into development success stories. Nations like Poland have increased their GDP by 179% since the fall of the USSR in 1990; Estonia’s GDP per capita in 1995 was $3,134, and in 2021 it’s just below $28,000.

Dr. Gevorkyan received his bachelor’s degree in International Trade and Finance from Louisiana State University, two master's in Economics from The New School and Louisiana State University, and his Ph.D. in economics from the New School. He is an expert on Central Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union economies. He is the author of numerous journals and articles, as well as the author of two books: ⁠Transition Economies⁠ and ⁠Financial Deepening and Post-Crisis Development in Emerging Markets.⁠ He is a professor and Henry George Chair in Economics at St. John’s University, as well as a member here at the Henry George School.

Together, we discussed some recent economic and political trends within the region, changes to the overall base and superstructure of the economy, and why a poly-crisis may not be as bad as it seems.

Podcasts and Publications Mentioned:

How Martin Wolf Understands This Global Economic Moment on The Ezra Klein Show: ⁠https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/how-martin-wolf-understands-this-global-economic-moment/id1548604447?i=1000623031651

Gevorkyan, A.V. (ed.). 2023. ⁠Foreign Exchange Constraint and Developing Economies⁠. Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing. ⁠⁠https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/usd/foreign-exchange-constraint-and-developing-economies-9781800880498.html⁠

Gevorkyan, A.V. 2018. ⁠Transition Economies: Transformation, Development, and Society in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.⁠ Oxford: Routledge. ⁠⁠https://goo.gl/otvbQe⁠

Minsky, H. Stabilizing an Unstable Economy ⁠⁠https://www.amazon.com/Stabilizing-Unstable-Economy-Hyman-Minsky/dp/0071592997

Kondratieff, N. (1935), ‘The Long Waves in Economic Life,’ Review of Economics and Statistics, 18 (6), 105–115.

Episode 96: Marty Rowland - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions. This is our final episode for the conference and will conclude our annual conference content. We hope you enjoyed it, and we’re looking forward to seeing you at next year’s conference.

Today we will be talking with Dr. Marty Rowland. He served in the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation as a Senior Project Manager for Environmental Remediation to help the city improve environmental quality, bettering living standards for all New Yorkers. He has taught at various institutions, such as Pace University and here at the Henry George School of Social Science. He is also a Senior Fellow with the Asset Leadership Network, a group that promotes financial awareness as a way to achieve social objectives.

To sustain the affordable housing programs we’ve discussed, we will need sound public policy that addresses the root causes of the crisis. Understanding previous land and housing policy can be a useful guide for navigating our current dilemma. In order to craft the best possible policies, we will need to comprehend how programs in the past failed. Comprehending this can improve future policies to maximize social outcomes.

Dr. Marty Rowland earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and his master’s from the University of New Orleans, both in Environmental Engineering. He later went on to earn his Ph.D. in Natural Resource Economics from the University of New Orleans as well.

In this episode, we discussed land and housing policies during the progressive era, how rent controls and community land trusts impact wellbeing, and how land-value tax policy has been considered over time.

Episode 95: Rick Rybeck - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions. These next 2 episodes will conclude our annual conference content. We hope you enjoyed it, and we’re looking forward to seeing you at next year’s conference.

We were joined today by Rick Rybeck. Mr. Rybeck is the founder and Director of Just Economics LLC, a firm founded in order to guide policy toward helping families. Their goal is to promote job creation, affordable housing, transportation efficiency, and sustainable development.

Traditional solutions to the affordable housing crisis have yielded little results. Simply throwing more money at the problem won’t help. Our guest today offers concrete solutions that have yet to be tried, that I think could make a positive impact. Often people with ambitious policy ideas don’t have a plan for implementing them, leaving many people unconvinced. However, today’s guest offers not just solutions, but ways to implement these solutions as well.

Mr. Rybeck received his master's in real estate and urban development from American University and his JD from the American University’s Washington College of Law.

In this episode, we discussed the politics of a land-value tax, why it isn’t an additional tax for everyone, and what its implementation would look like from a legislative perspective.

Episode 94: Katelin Penner - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions. These next 3 episodes will conclude our annual conference content. We hope you enjoyed it, and we’re looking forward to seeing you at next year’s conference.

For our program today, we were joined by Ms. Katelin Penner. Currently, Ms. Penner is an urban planner for NYC HPD's Office of Neighborhood Strategies focused on the conversion of publicly owned vacant land to deeply affordable housing. She is also the Co-Editor in Chief of the "Hunter Urban Review."

Conventional methods to making housing more affordable have failed so far. And because the housing crisis is so complex, it will require more creative solutions.

Katelin is a master’s student at Hunter College where she studies urban planning. Her research focuses on vacant lots, the impacts of municipal austerity measures, and community resilience. She put together a fascinating presentation on innovative policies being tested around the world.

In this episode, we discussed potential uses of vacant land, how local governments can better incentivize more equitable uses of housing, and some of the benefits of co-op and tenant-led ownership models.

Episode 93: Tom Rossman - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions. These next 4 episodes will conclude our annual conference content. We hope you enjoyed it, and we’re looking forward to seeing you at next year’s conference.

For our program today, we were joined by Mr. Tom Rossman. Mr. Rossman is a financier and investor, who specializes in developing nations and emerging markets. After the fall of the Soviet Union, Mr. Rossman helped establish investment institutions in Turkey, former Soviet Union states, and North Africa. Throughout his career, Tom has helped nations democratize and sustainably develop to bring new opportunities to these regions. He has spoken at conferences across the world from Baku to London to Houston. He received his bachelor’s degree in history and religious studies from Nyack College and earned his master’s from Tufts in international relations. Currently, he is an advisor to the Telosa Community Foundation; a group hoping to build a futuristic from-scratch city that will revolutionize urban living.

In this episode, we discussed how we can design cities to be more inclusive and sustainable, if we are in a second gilded age, and why a sense of community has been missing from neighborhoods for the past few decades.

Episode 92: Dr. John Krinsky - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions.

John Krinsky is a professor of Political Science at the City University of New York (CUNY).

Dr. Krinsky earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University and focuses on public policy, urban politics, and modern protest and activist movements. He is the author of "Who Cleans the Park" and "Free Labor." Both offer examinations of labor and job policies from state and local levels. Dr. Krinsky is also the co-editor of two journals: Metro-politics and Social Movement Studies. In addition to his work in academia, he is also the founder of New York City Community Land Initiative, a grassroots collective of non-profits and NGOs that promote community land trusts and housing for all.

In this episode, we discussed some of the failures of market-based approaches, evaluating policy responses to poverty & inequality, and the differences in exchange- or monetary-value versus use-value.

Episode 91: Brendan Cheney - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions.

Brendan Cheney is the Director of Policy and Communications at the New York Housing Conference. The New York Housing Conference is a policy and advocacy non-profit dedicated to advancing state, local, and federal housing policies.

Mr. Cheney earned his bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and his master’s in public administration from Syracuse. He has extensive experience as a policy analyst and consultant. Mr. Cheney was also a staff writer for Politico, writing about housing policy and homelessness, often using data to communicate trends and complex ideas. As Director of Policy and Operations, he oversees all advocacy and policy efforts on behalf of the conference.

In this episode, we talked about the priorities of Governor Kathy Hochul, got into the weeds of federal and state housing policy, and explained the concept of “affordability depth.”

Episode 90: Ross Karp - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions.

Ross Karp is the Downstate Development Director of Home and Community Renewal (HCR), an agency within New York State. HCR is part of the state’s Executive branch and is in charge of administering housing policy.

New York’s Governor, Kathy Hochul, created a housing plan with $25 billion in funding. As Development Director, Mr. Karp helps oversee these funds and achieve New York’s goal of maintaining and revitalizing communities.

Mr. Karp received his bachelor’s degree in philosophy from the University of Chicago, and his master’s in city planning from MIT. He has extensive policy and governance experience working for both the City of Chicago and New York and within the State of New York.

In this episode, we discuss some of the housing initiatives under Governor Hochul, a few financing options available to developers, and why New York struggles to increase the supply of housing.

Episode 89: Lindsay Duvall - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions.

Lindsay Duvall is a Senior Organizer for the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC). NLIHC aims to create policy that ensures people of low income have access to and can afford quality housing through advocacy, activism, and shaping public opinion. Ms. Duvall previously worked at the Oregon Food Bank where she addressed hunger through outreach and volunteer mobilization. She earned her bachelor’s degree in architecture from the University of Cincinnati and a master’s degree in educational leadership and policy from Portland State University.

In this episode, we discuss housing policy in the legislative pipeline, some fascinating facts regarding New York City’s housing crisis, and which states offer sufficient affordable renting units for low-income earners.

Episode 88: Brad Lander - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions.

Brad Lander is the Comptroller of New York City, where he is in charge of making the best investments possible toward a more sustainable and resilient New York.

Mr. Lander is a former community organizer and non-profit leader. He began his career at Fifth Avenue Committee, a non-profit that builds and developed affordable housing. After 2009, he became the Director of the Pratt Center for Community Development, an institute in Brooklyn, New York where he focused on developing communities sustainably and affordably.

Mr. Lander has been a harsh critic of the New York City tax system and, coming from a non-profit, has different ideas for how to fix it. As comptroller, Brad has tried to amend the system in order to create more resilient communities.

In this episode, we discuss how the current system of unaffordable housing was created, how taxes can improve or worsen the situation, and what his office will be working towards for the remainder of his term.

Episode 87: Mark Mollineaux - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions.

Mr. Mollineaux is a lifelong Georgist and hosts a popular podcast, Georgist Perspectives, on Stanford’s radio where he hosts discussions on Georgist perspectives.

In this episode, we discuss the historical trajectories urban planning has led us to and redistributive solutions that benefit city dwellers and promote equity.

Episode 86: Angela Lee Stovall - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions.

Angela Lee Stovall is a research and policy manager for JustFix.Nyc. JustFix.Nyc is a non-profit that helps ensure livable housing standards in New York by offering renters and tenants resources and data to help navigate the unaffordability crisis in residential housing.

Ms. Stovall began her career as a defense attorney against eviction cases for the New York Legal Assistance Group. Recently, she worked as part of New York City Commission on Human Rights’ Income Discrimination Unit, as an intervention manager. She has constantly worked towards ending discrimination and reducing inequality.

In this episode, we discuss how real estate has become increasingly corporatized, why higher concentrations of land ownership in the hands of fewer people leads to inequality, and how affordable high-quality rentals can help sustain a healthy middle class.

Episode 85: Dr. Ryan-Collins - 2023 Annual Conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions

Today's episode comes from our most recent annual conference: Why is Housing so Unaffordable? Causes and Solutions.

Dr. Josh Ryan-Collins serves as an economist for the University of London. His research focuses on macroeconomic stability, housing and land dynamics, and sustainable development. He authored several publications, including: "Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing," "Why Can’t You Afford a Home?," and "Where Does Money Come From?" Dr. Ryan-Collins holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the University of Warwick in sociology and industrial relations, respectively, and a Ph.D. in applied economics from the University of Southampton.

In this episode, we discuss some of the current housing trends, examine what caused the decline in homeownership in developed nations, and contemplate why some of the classical theories around land ownership may need rethinking.

Episode 84: How you can become bigger than yourself

Mr. Manekin is a social entrepreneur and community organizer from the Baltimore area. I first met him at a professional development training camp where he gave a speech about social entrepreneurship and how we can become the change within the communities that we want to see. Thibault is the cofounder of PeacePlayers and Seawall. PeacePlayers is an international non-profit that helps bridge divides and empower youth through sports and education. Seawall is a real estate development company that operates as a social business. Collaborating with the community, Seawall has successfully renovated and developed quintessential parts of the Baltimore area, giving them new life and a new look. They have successfully built three apartment buildings offering discounts to local teachers, renovated Baltimore’s famous Lexington Market, as well as many other examples, all while shaping their plans based on the community’s needs and input.

Together, we discussed how state and local governments, along with the private sector, can cooperate to help communities develop, how your values can impact your business practices, and how real estate and land can impact society.

Episode 83: Land value taxes and Toronto's housing crisis

Ms. Brown is a community organizer and mayoral candidate for the City of Toronto. She received her bachelor’s from Ryerson University in public administration and governance, and her master's from Humber College in human resource management and administrative services. Chloe has spent her life advocating for change within her community. Her campaign focuses on issues of inequality, land use, and quality of life. Many of her solutions revolve around an equitable use of land or progressive taxation that would distribute benefits to the working class.

When listening to this talk, think about land ownership and all the different benefits of it. If you are a renter or someone who just likes to move around a lot in this age of digital nomads, what are the economic or political benefits you miss out on? Ms. Brown looks to solve this problem by removing the mutual exclusivity of land ownership and rights. I encourage you to think about how expanding liberty to those without ownership of land could diffuse power, and how that would create different economic outcomes.

This week we discussed how Toronto can improve housing, why relying on real estate developers can lead to unaffordable housing, and how taxation can be used to incentivize equitable development.

Episode 82: A lesson on Georgist economics

Dr. Tideman is a Georgist economist, whose family have been Georgists for generations. He received his bachelor’s degree in mathematics and economics from Reed College and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. He has spent his career immersed in economics, teaching at numerous universities such as Harvard, the University of Buckingham, and Virginia Tech, where he currently teaches. Dr. Tideman reached the pinnacle of his career in the 1970’s working for the president's council of economic advisers. He has held advisory positions within the Office of Management and Budget and Treasury Department. He is the author of many journal publications and is the author of two books: Collective Decisions and Voting and Land and Taxation; both examine collectivist economic models and decision-making.

This week we discussed left-libertarianism, how land values and taxes can be systematized, and why a carbon tax is insufficient for promoting equality but good for the environment.

Episode 81: The pharmaceutical industry and changes under the IRA

Dr. Cohen received his master’s and Ph.D. from the University of Amsterdam, both in economics. Before his academic career, Dr. Cohen worked as a management consultant at Accenture. He has spent over 24 years studying and understanding the healthcare and pharmaceutical industry. Josh’s expertise ranges from regulatory practices to drug discovery and has over one hundred publications in numerous journals. In addition to his publications, Josh has also written for numerous periodicals and is currently a contributor to Forbes.

Together, we discussed the changes within the pharmaceutical industry caused by the IRA, how drug prices are formulated from manufacturer to consumer, and why the IRA is more of a reform than it is large-scale change.

Episode 80: Economics with a little humor

Dr. Bauman earned his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Reed College, and his master’s and Ph.D. from the University of Washington in Economics. Known as the first and only “Standup Economist” Dr. Bauman likes to inject humor into his teachings and analyze economic issues through a comedic lens. He is the author of several books including, "Tax Shift" and "The Cartoon Introduction to Economics." The former is an analysis of how to align our environmental goals with our tax system, while the latter is a beginner's book to learning economics. When he is not writing, Dr. Bauman performs his routine at companies, colleges, and conferences. He has performed for events hosted by Time Magazine, PBS, and NPR. He is also an activist, supporting and leading multiple environmental movements, most prominently, Clean the Darn Air, a movement created to encourage more environmental ballot initiatives in his home state of Utah.

Dr. Bauman joined the Henry George School to discuss reforming economics education, how Canada implemented a carbon tax, and how taxing land value can improve welfare outcomes.

Episode 79: UBI and strengthening our social safety net

Mr. Marinescu graduated from the University of Waterloo with a mathematics and computer science degree. Floyd is the founder and CEO of C4Media, InfoQ, and UBI Works. C4Media and InfoQ is a news organization that spreads information about computer software and SaaS (software as a service). UBI Works is an organization Mr. Marinescu created in order to raise awareness of the benefits of UBI and its socioeconomic benefits. When he is not working towards either of these endeavors, he is also an angel investor for several startups that look to make a social impact.

Together, we discussed the benefits of having common and public goods, how rent-seeking negatively impacts well-being, and the pros and cons of incremental vs systemic change.

Episode 78: The monetary response to Covid-19

Dr. Rasmus is a professor at St. Mary’s college in California where he focuses on inequality and economic crises. Dr. Rasmus began his career in journalism and is the author of numerous books on the political economy, such as "Central Bankers at the End of Their Rope?", "The Scourge of Neoliberalism," and "Epic Recession." He has served as a negotiator, organizer, and president of multiple local unions. He is the host of the radio show "Alternative Visions" and has contributed to multiple magazines, such as "World Financial Review," "European Financial Review," and "World Review of the Political Economy."

We discussed the monetary response to Covid-19 and its macroeconomic impact, how modern technology impacts communication in politics, and Dr. Rasmus' critique of mainstream monetary theory.

Episode 77: Making societies more adaptable to crises

Mr. Harrison received his bachelor's from Oxford University and his master’s from the University of London. He is a veteran journalist who has served in multiple news agencies such as "The People" and "Wellington Journal." In 1988 he became the Research Director of the Land Research Trust, London, and has advised several corporations and international governments on tax and economic policy. Fred emphasizes the housing market and its interaction with the economy. He is the author of many books, including "The Corruption of Economics," "The Power in the Land," and "A Philosophy for a Fair Society," all of which critique mainstream economic thinking. Most of today’s discussion will center around Fred’s book "#WeAreRent," which offers policy solutions that empower societies to adapt to crises and transform governance for the common good. When listening to this episode, I encourage you to listen to Fred’s solution to rent-seeking, which requires a more moralistic approach to capitalism. It is also worth considering how land comes into play and how Mr. Harrison’s solutions impact property values. Together, we discussed how land value taxes could lower rents, why progressive policies can be unpalatable to most people, and how old ideas perpetuate the issues progressives try to solve.

Episode 76: Small government and anti-elitism

Dr. Chiu received her bachelor’s from Smith College, her master’s from Northwestern, and her Ph.D. from Oxford University, all in English. Dr. Chiu is a critic of contemporary politics and philosophy, but not through traditional means. Her unique perspective instead comes from a literary point of view. Her research is conducted on how reform politics is represented in literature from the 18th to 20th century. Her most recent project on Thomas Paine has received national recognition, as she currently teaches the only class on Paine’s philosophy. Dr. Chiu has contributed to many articles, books, and other publications, her most recent being The Routledge Guidebook to Paine's Rights of Man. She is currently a professor at the New School, where she focuses on gender and identity, history, and political science. In her teachings of Thomas Paine, Dr. Chiu often revisits his old ideas with new perspectives. I urge you to focus on her concept of what Paine thought of as “small” or “limited government”, which was much more anti-elitist than most conservative schools of thought. I urge you to consider how this idea of anti-elite small government intertwines with modern conservatism, and how conservatives discuss limited government. Together, we discussed the Founding Father’s ideas for how to build a constitutional democracy, how personal versus national interests conflicted in the drafting of the Constitution, and how power originally became concentrated within elite circles.

Episode 75: How to make cities permanently adaptable

Mr. Marohn received his bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and his master’s in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Minnesota. Charles leads an industrious career in City and Urban Planning. He is the founder and current president of Strong Towns, a non-profit dedicated to making cities habitable and safe through collaborative local government. Charles analyzes public policy through an engineering lens, which leads him to find inefficiencies that work against the public’s best interest. He is the author of "Confessions of a Recovering Engineer", "A World Class Transportation System", and "Strong Towns"; all of which discuss how urban planning can improve living standards and better develop communities. Mr. Marohn has a very unique idea of what he calls “Finished Cities” which can be characterized as static adaptation. I urge you to pay attention to how this concept connects with the financial system and local government. We were lucky enough to join Mr. Marohn in discussing his idea of how cities can become more adaptable to the future, how our ideas around urban planning changed over time, and how public policy failed to prevent the deterioration of Detroit.

Episode 74: How will AI impact your job?

Our episode today comes from our most recent panel discussion titled Automation, AI and ChatGPT - How will Labor be Affected? Our panel explores the role of new AI technology and its disruption within advanced economies. The digital revolution heralded massive gains in efficiency and development, but will new breakthroughs be as beneficial? New inventions like Chat GPT or Google’s Bard will be immensely useful, but many worry about them replacing their human counterparts. Will the AI revolution bridge divides, or further perpetuate inequalities? If you’re tired of all the doom and gloom and want an open and honest discussion on AI, then this is the program for you. Our talk is hosted by our Director of Education, Ibrahima Drame, who is joined by Ed Dodson, Dr. Sandeep Sacheti, and Dr. Ansel Schiavone.

Episode 73: An ethical perspective on UBI

Dr. Charles Clark earned his bachelor’s degree from Fordham University in economics, and his master’s and Ph.D. from the New School in the History of Economic Thought and Industrial Organization. He is currently a Senior Fellow at the Vincentian Center and previously served as President of the Association for Evolutionary Economics and the Association for Institutionalist Thought. Dr. Clark has authored over 150 different journal publications and two books: "Rich and Poor" and "Rediscovering Abundance"; both examine the role of inequality and how it impacts policy. Dr. Clark is currently a professor at St. John’s University, the University College of Cork, and the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome. When he is not teaching, Dr. Clark works on fiscal policy consulting, tax, and welfare reform, and serves as Advisor to the Holy See Permanent Mission to the United Nations. Together we discussed Universal Basic Income (UBI). Most conversations around UBI focus on costs or how they will impact individuals’ incentives. However, our talk was a little different. We instead chose to talk about UBI through an ethics and human-flourishing lens. When listening to this talk, I encourage you to think of quality of life, and how UBI would impact standards of living.

Episode 72: The centrality of human rights within economics

Mr. Doyle is a former senior economist at the International Monetary Fund (IMF). As a senior economist, he headed their Europe division but later resigned after becoming highly critical of IMF leadership. Peter earned his bachelor’s from the University of Oxford and has focused his research on macroeconomics, international development, and the environment. Before his time at the IMF, Peter worked at the Bank of England and was a fellow at the Overseas Development Institute. Mr. Doyle has written articles for numerous journals and think tanks including, the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, the Huffington Post, and the Financial Times. We were lucky enough to join Peter in discussing slavery, how human rights are central to economic philosophy, and how social democracy can help reorient economics towards outcomes that improve general welfare.

Episode 71: The true origins of the Monopoly game and its Georgist roots

Our episode today comes from our most recent panel discussion titled "Monopoly! The Real Story Behind America’s Most Popular Game." This talk explores the true origins of the board game and how its original creator intended it as a way to learn about Georgism. Most do not know this, including myself before listening to the talk, but the inventor, Lizzie Magie, was a sharp political commentator of her time. Using all sorts of creative methods, including the board game itself, Lizzie was a shrewd political critic of her era. As a progressive during the gilded age, Ms. Magie used her voice to shed light on the struggles of civil rights movements. If you love programs on how companies are started or how things are made, you’ll definitely want to check out this episode. Our talk is hosted by our Director of Education, Ibrahima Drame, who is joined by author and journalist, Mary Pilon.

Episode 70: How environmental ethics should shape our understanding of economics

Ms. Hartzok is a long-time environmental activist and ethicist. She received her bachelor’s degree from Ohio Wesleyan University and her graduate degree from the University of West Georgia, both in psychology. She is the author of The Earth Belongs to Everyone, a collection of essays that explores how democracy can be used to achieve environmental rights. Ms. Hartzok is also the author of Democracy, Earth Rights, and the Next Economy, an influential essay on environmental ethics and their role within the economy. Alanna is currently an Administrator at the International Union for Land Value Tax and Co-Director of the Earth Rights Institute, a non-profit organization that focuses on land rights and land value taxation. Together we discussed the Green New Deal and its potential flaws, how a land value tax could help fund such a project, and the need for a fundamental macroeconomic restructuring towards a more inclusive framework that considers the environment.

Episode 69: What real estate markets and debt tell us about the long-term

Philip is the founder and director of Economic Indicator Services and Property Sharemarket Economics, which helps companies understand and navigate business and economic cycles. Mr. Anderson earned his bachelor's degree from RMIT University in Australia. He is also the author of The Secret Life of Real Estate and Banking, an analysis of property and debt cycles and how investors can navigate the market. Philip joined the Henry George School to discuss the relationship between real estate and recessions, how Alaska’s oil dividend reduces inequality, and how debt and inflation play a role in long-term economic trends.

Episode 67: The economic perils of Amazon

Dr. Gaster received multiple bachelor's degrees from Oxford University in politics, economics, and philosophy. He later went on to earn his master’s in philosophy from the University of Kent and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. After two years of teaching at the University of Virginia, he would eventually become a research fellow at the Office of Technology Assessment, an arm of the United States Congress. Since then, Dr. Gaster founded Incumetrics, a consulting company that focuses on politics, economics, and technology. He is currently a visiting scholar at The George Washington University Institute for Public Policy and is the author of "Behemoth, Amazon Rising." Together, we discussed how Amazon became the behemoth it is today, the impact its size has on innovation and competition, and why the US’s reliance on the company is so perilous.

Episode 66: Does race affect inequality?

Dr. Mora is an expert on the intersection of labor and race within the economy. She received her bachelor’s and masters from the University of New Mexico, and her Ph.D. from Texas A&M University, all in economics. She has vast teaching experience working as a professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, and New Mexico State University, and is currently a Provost Ad Interim and professor of Economics at the Metropolitan State University of Denver. She has shared her research with world-renowned institutions such as the Federal Reserve and the Department of Labor. Dr. Mora has written over 50 articles in journals such as "International Migration Review," "Industrial Relations," and "Social Science Quarterly." In addition to her journals, she has written many books such as "Hispanic Entrepreneurs in the 2000s," "Socioeconomic Outcomes of Island and Mainland Puerto Ricans," and many more. We were lucky enough to talk with Dr. Mora about why Puerto Rico is excluded from development within the US, how land plays a role within Puerto Rican politics, and what explains the inequality between Latin Americans and the average American.

Episode 65: A talk with Mexico's former Foreign Affairs secretary

Dr. Castañeda is the former Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs under President Vicente Fox. He received his bachelor's degree from Lycée Franco-Mexicain, his master’s from Princeton in history, and his doctorate in economic history from the University of Paris. Dr. Castañeda began his political career advising different presidential campaigns. After a successful run with Vicente Fox, he was appointed Secretary of Foreign Affairs. In 2003 he was appointed to the UN Commission on the Private Sector and Development, and would later go on to run for president himself. Dr. Castañeda is a contributor to many publications including "The New York Times" and "Foreign Affairs." He is the author of Utopia Unarmed and America Through Foreign Eyes, all of which center around geopolitics and the political economy. Together we discussed the role Mexico plays in the world, why trade agreements have not spurred development as much as policy-makers had hoped, and why inequality has increased between the North and South of Mexico.

Episode 64: Bonds' role in local development

Colleen Woodell earned her bachelor’s degree from Wells College in economics, and her master’s from NYU. Ms. Woodell is a veteran financial regulator. She has held senior positions at Standard and Poor, Fitch, and Moody’s. Her vast experience with the municipal bond market gives her a wealth of knowledge on government debt's role within the economy. Together we discussed how municipal bonds play into local development, how important property taxes are to state governments, and the impact a Land Value Tax would have if it were implemented in real life.

Episode 63: Dr. Edward Nell returns to discuss rent seeking behavior and different macroeconomic models

Dr. Nell attained his bachelor's degree in economics from Princeton University and his master's and Ph.D. from Oxford University in England, after being awarded the Rhodes Scholarship. Dr. Nell has taught at numerous universities in the U.S. and across the globe including Wesleyan, Bennington College, McGill University, Bard College, and the University of Siena. He has written for many economic journals on macroeconomic theory, development, and monetary and financial analysis. He is also the author of "The General Theory of Transformational Growth," "Making Sense of a Changing Economy," and many more. We were lucky enough to join Dr. Nell in discussing the role of conflict and competition in economics, Henry George’s theories of trade, and how saving and investment interact in macroeconomic models.

Episode 63: Dr. Edward Nell returns to discuss rent seeking behavior and different macroeconomic models

Dr. Nell attained his bachelor's degree in economics from Princeton University and his master's and Ph.D. from Oxford University in England, after being awarded the Rhodes Scholarship. Dr. Nell has taught at numerous universities in the U.S. and across the globe including Wesleyan, Bennington College, McGill University, Bard College, and the University of Siena. He has written for many economic journals on macroeconomic theory, development, and monetary and financial analysis. He is also the author of "The General Theory of Transformational Growth," "Making Sense of a Changing Economy," and many more. We were lucky enough to join Dr. Nell in discussing the role of conflict and competition in economics, Henry George’s theories of trade, and how saving and investment interact in macroeconomic models.

Episode 62: Cryptocurrencies: Computing Foundations, Risks, and Socioeconomic Impacts

Dr. Raphaële Chappe is a Defi Economist and Director of R&D and Strategy at DeVol Network. Gabi Zodik is the director of Blockchain and Web3 at IBM Research. Prof. Eerke Boiten is a professor of Cyber Security and Head of the School of Computer Science and Informatics, De Montfort University, Leicester UK. Ed Dodson spent his career in a variety of management roles at Fannie Mae and is a a Senior Researcher and long-time member of the Henry George School. Our discussion revolved around how cryptocurrencies work, their impact on public policy, and the cybersecurity risks they present.

Episode 61: The failure of public policy in addressing poverty and inequality

Mr. Harrison received his bachelor's from Oxford University and his master’s from the University of London. He is a veteran journalist who has served in multiple news agencies such as The People and Wellington Journal. In 1988 he became the Research Director of the Land Research Trust, London, and has advised several corporations and international governments on tax and economic policy. Fred places an emphasis on the housing market and its interaction with the economy as a whole. He is the author of many books, including "The Corruption of Economics," "The Power in the Land," and "A Philosophy for a Fair Society," all of which critique mainstream economic thinking. Mr. Harrison joined the Henry George School to discuss the consequences of generational poverty and inequality, why quantitative easing will fail to quell the next financial crisis, and why tech billionaires love the idea of basic income.

Episode 60: Possessive Individualism and the role of human nature in economic analysis

Dr. Bromley earned his bachelor’s degree from Utah State University in Ecology and master's and Ph.D. from Oregon State University in natural resource economics. He is Professor (Emeritus) at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and a visiting professor at the Humboldt University - Berlin where he teaches environmental economics and ecology. He is also a fellow at the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association. Dr. Bromley is quite a prolific author as well. Dr. Bromley has contributed to multiple journals on topics such as resource management and ecological economics. He is the author of "Vulnerable People Vulnerable States," "Making the Commons Work," as well as numerous ecology textbooks. Dr. Bromley served as Chair of the U.S. Federal Advisory Committee on Marine Protected Areas, an arm of the Department of the Interior. He has served as an advisor at many prestigious organizations such as the World Bank, the Ford Foundation, and the Asian Development Bank. Dr. Bromley joined the Henry George School to discuss how property rights affect environmental conservation efforts, why the marginal revolution fails to properly educate economics students, and the role of human nature in economic analysis. It was a pretty interesting conversation.

Episode 59: Getting public policy right

Dr. Rasmus is a professor at St. Mary’s college in California where he focuses on inequality and economic crises. Dr. Rasmus began his career in journalism and is the author of numerous books on the political economy such as "Central Bankers at the End of Their Rope," "The Scourge of Neoliberalism," and "Epic Recession." He has served as a negotiator, organizer, and president of multiple local unions. He is the host of the radio show "Alternative Visions" and has contributed to multiple magazines and journals, such as World Financial Review, European Financial Review, and World Review of the Political Economy. Together we discussed why a historical perspective is crucial for public policy, the impact of the decades-long tax cuts in the US, and why most of the world’s growth stemmed from China in the 2010s.

Episode 58: The allure of populism and what it means for the world order

Mr. Harrison earned his bachelor’s in economics from Dartmouth and his master’s in finance from Columbia. Edward’s career has taken many turns, working as an executive at a technology company, an investment banker, and even a diplomat. His diverse experiences throughout his career have given him a well-rounded perspective to interpreting macroeconomic events. He was the author of "Credit Writedowns," a blog that examines economic and political trends through a global lens. Mr. Harrison has successfully predicted economic patterns such as the 2007 Financial Crisis and the Mid-Cycle Pause between 2014 and 2021. He is the founder of "Real Vision," a financial media startup intended to promote financial awareness through political and economic analysis. He has also appeared as a commentator on numerous news stations, such as the BBC. Together we discussed what caused the rise in populism in Europe and across the world, what it means for the future of the post-WW2 order, and why the appeal of populism is so alluring despite the general improvement of living conditions over time.

Episode 57: The future of US unionization and labor

Dr. Lafer earned his bachelor’s in economics from Swarthmore College and his Ph.D. from Yale in political science. He has taught at numerous colleges around the world including the University of Oregon, UMass Amherst, Tel Aviv University, and Hebrew University. His work and teachings have focused on industrial policy and labor law. From 2009-2010 he served as Senior Policy Advisor to the United States Congress as part of its Committee on Education and Labor. Dr. Lafer is the author of "The Job Training Charade" and "The One Percent," both examinations of the failure of modern economic and labor policy in America. He is currently a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute in Washington D.C. where he studies topics such as unions and labor law. Together we discussed the decline of union membership, why the decline of big labor led to increased influence from non-profits, and how a better-planned tax system can better serve working-class Americans.

Episode 56: Lindy Davies on the progress of Henry George

Mr. Davies was the program director of the Henry George Institute and editor of the Georgist Journal. He is the author of "The Sassafras Crossing" and "The Alodia Scrapbook," both of which are fiction novels that explore the topic of development on a local, more personal level. In addition to his novels, he was the editor of the Mason Gaffney Reader and the creator of Henry George’s abridged version of The Science of the Political Economy, one of George’s seminal works. A lover of all things Henry George, Lindy spent his life promoting Georgist values and spreading his word. Mr. Davies, unfortunately, passed away in 2019. May he rest in peace. Together we discussed the progress Georgists have made in promoting Georgist values, how monopolies act as extractive institutions in the economy, and why a systemic view is better for solving economic quandaries than a micro-based approach.

Episode 55: How big tech and algorithms make us worse off

Dr. O’Neil earned her bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley and received her Ph.D. from Harvard in mathematics. She spent the early part of her career teaching at MIT and Barnard but eventually left for the private sector. After a few years as a finance professional, she eventually became disillusioned with the industry and would eventually join the Occupy Wall Street movement. She is a regular contributor to Bloomberg and is the author of "The Shame Machine," "Doing Data Science," and "Weapons of Math Destruction"; which all explore the negative impacts data analytics and algorithms have on society. Dr. O'Neil joined us in discussing how big data and the use of algorithms became more common in everyday life, how their use creates negative externalities with socioeconomic repercussions, and what caused her dislike of the finance industry.

Episode 54: The path toward a post-crisis Greek recovery

Dr. Lapavitsas earned his master’s from the London School of Economics and his Ph.D. from Birkbeck, University of London. He has taught at the New School and the School of Oriental and African studies. Dr. Lapavitsas is known as a sharp critic of western financial capitalism. He has worked as a regular columnist for The Guardian and founded Research, Money, and Finance, a collective of political economists who focus on money, finance, and the two's intersection with capitalism. In 2015, he was elected to the Greek Parliament as a member of the Syriza party in order to help Greece regain its footing after the Greek Debt Crisis. He is the author of numerous books, including "Crisis in the Eurozone," "Profiting without Producing," and "The Left Case Against the EU." Dr. Lapavitsas joined us to discuss how leaving the EU’s monetary union could transform the Greek economy, why financialization harms people in the long-run, and why Germany’s wages remain stagnant despite its economic dynamism.

Episode 53: A systems view of the world order

Mr. Amin received his bachelor’s in political science at the Sciences Po, in France, and his master’s in economics and statistics from INSEE, a demographics bureau of the French government. Samir grew up in Cairo and Paris where he witnessed the benefits of development and the horrors of colonialism as well. After graduating, he worked for the French and Mali governments where he studied under-development and its linkage to the world order. Mr. Amin is known for his work on dependency theory and world system theory. He was associated with multiple socialist political groups, yet criticized Soviet communism. He is the author of many books including, "The Implosion of Contemporary Capitalism," "A Global History: A View from the South," and "Eurocentrism." He was one of the world's most prominent Marxist economists and a potent critic of capitalism. Mr. Amin joined us to discuss how monopolies can lead to oligarchies, why another financial crisis is looming around the corner, and how one can identify and define imperialism.

Episode 52: The intersection of technology, politics, and economics

Dr. Gaster received multiple bachelor's degrees from the University of Oxford in politics, economics, and philosophy. He later went on to earn his master’s in philosophy from the University of Kent and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. After two years of teaching at the University of Virginia, he would eventually become a research fellow at the Office of Technology Assessment, an arm of the United States Congress. Since then, Dr. Gaster founded Incumetrics, a consulting company that focuses on politics, economics, and technology. He is currently a visiting scholar at the George Washington University Institute for Public Policy and is the author of "Behemoth, Amazon Rising." Together, the Henry George School and Dr. Gaster discussed how small firms can be successful, the rise of the gig economy, and why productivity has stagnated across developed nations.

Episode 51: Fred Harrison on economic policy and social reform

Mr. Harrison received his bachelor's from Oxford University and his master’s from the University of London. He is a veteran journalist who has served in multiple news agencies such as The People and Wellington Journal. In 1988 he became the Research Director of the Land Research Trust, London, and has advised several corporations and international governments on tax and economic policy. Fred places an emphasis on the housing market and its interaction with the economy as a whole. He is the author of many books, including "The Corruption of Economics," "The Power in the Land," and "A Philosophy for a Fair Society," all of which critique mainstream economic thinking. Mr. Harrison joined us to discuss why he focuses so much on land and housing, rentier capitalism, and why passing redistributive policies can be so hard.

Episode 50: A brief history of the modern political economy

Dr. Rasmus is a professor at St. Mary’s college in California where he focuses on inequality and economic crises. Dr. Rasmus began his career in journalism and is the author of numerous books on the political economy such as "Central Bankers at the End of Their Rope," "The Scourge of Neoliberalism," and "Epic Recession." He has served as a negotiator, organizer, and president of multiple local unions. He is the host of the radio show Alternative Visions and has contributed to multiple magazines, such as World Financial Review, European Financial Review, and World Review of the Political Economy. Together we discussed the impact of public policy under Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan, his prediction for trade policy under the Trump presidency, and a history of the modern political economy. We apologize in advance for the poor audio quality, as Andrew was sick during the time of recording.

Episode 49: How unions can improve employee welfare while keeping firms competitive

Mr. Andy Stern has been a labor leader and activist since 1973. He began his bachelor’s degree in business at the University of Pennsylvania, but would eventually finish his degree in urban planning. He started his career as a welfare caseworker for the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), and eventually was elected Union President. He is a Senior Fellow at the Economic Security Project. He is the author of "Raising the Floor," "A Country That Works," "Oil: From Rockefeller to Iraq," and "Who Won the Oil Wars?". Most revolve around building a more egalitarian and cooperative approach to economic growth. Stern’s approach to bargaining and leadership has always been to find common ground with people he finds disagreeable. Together we discussed his negotiating techniques, what the true goal of unions should be, and how to strike a balance between improving employees’ lives while keeping employers competitive.

Episode 48: Urban Planning for maximum reliability with Dr. Marty Rowland

Dr. Marty Rowland earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and his master’s from the University of New Orleans, both in Environmental Engineering. He later went on to earn his Ph.D. in Natural Resource Economics from the University of New Orleans as well. He served in the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation as a Senior Project Manager for Environmental Remediation to help the city improve environmental quality, bettering living standards for all New Yorkers. He has taught at various institutions, such as Pace University and here at the Henry George School of Social Science. He is also a Senior Fellow with the Asset Leadership Network, a group that promotes financial awareness as a way to achieve social objectives. Dr. Rowland joined us in discussing infrastructure management, affordable housing in Manhattan, and strategies for efficient urban planning.

Episode 47: The Impacts of Congestion Pricing Policy on New York City

Our host, Dr. Ibrahima Dramé earned a Ph.D. in International Political Economy from the University of Tsukuba in Japan. Dr. Marty Rowland earned his Ph.D. in Natural Resource Economics from the University of New Orleans. He has taught at various institutions, such as Pace University and here at the Henry George School of Social Science. Dan Sullivan is a Georgist scholar, former President of the Council of Georgist Organizations (CGO), and Director of Saving Communities, a Pennsylvania-based association that promotes fiscal integrity and economic justice. Ms. Denise Favorule is a licensed Real Estate Broker at the Corcoran Group. Dr. Gevorkyan received his Ph.D. in economics from the New School. He is a Subject Matter Expert on Macroeconomics at the Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the United Nations, a Research Fellow at the Center for Global Business Stewardship, as well as a professor of economics at St. John’s University. Together we discussed traffic congestion pricing policy, its impacts on low- and middle-income households, and different alternatives that could improve living standards in New York.

Episode 46: Why "progress" grew wealth, but didn't reduce poverty

Dr. Roemer is quite interesting, to say the least. He received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard and went to U.C. Berkeley for his graduate degree, but was suspended for his political activity against the Vietnam War. After spending time teaching, he would eventually return to Berkeley to finish his Ph.D. in economics in 1974. He is currently the Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Stout Professor of Political Science and Economics at Yale University, and a Fellow at the Econometric Society as well as the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has contributed to numerous economic journals on topics such as labor economics, political competition, and climate change. In addition to his journals, Dr. Roemer has published numerous books such as "Free to Lose," "A General Theory," and "A Future of Socialism." All revolve around inequality and its relation to the political economy. Together with Dr. Roemer, we discussed the rise of Bernie Sanders, issues with Marx’s Labor Theory of Value, and how redistribution can take the form of more than welfare programs.

Episode 45: A discussion on QE and monetary policy with Michael Mattie

Michael Mattie is the founder of Doylestown Wealth Management, a financial planning and wealth management firm. Before joining the Marine Corps, Mr. Mattie earned a bachelor’s degree in business from the University of Delaware. After graduating he began to work in the finance industry for a number of years. Eventually, Michael wrote his own book titled "The Global Addiction to QE: The Most Important Topic Affecting your Retirement: A Guide." This book is a detailed exploration of the history of quantitative easing and its effect on financial markets. A lover of everything investing, Mr. Mattie has spent his lifetime helping others save for their retirement and understand financial markets. Together we discussed monetary policy under Alan Greenspan, his critique of the Federal Reserve, and why deficit spending may not be such a bad thing.

Episode 44: How to implement a Land Value Tax with Steve Taft

Mr. Taft graduated from Washington University. Steven is currently a Senior Vice President of Portfolio Management, and Senior Portfolio Manager, as well as a certified Financial Planner and Advisor at Morgan Stanley. He began working on Wall Street as a financial advisor in the late 80s, and later went on to work for companies such as Lehman Brothers and Paine Webber. He is the author of "A True Free Market: Conversations on Gaining Liberty and Justice Through Economics." Our friendly discussion included the mechanics of Henry George’s Land Value Tax, how it can eliminate other taxes, and key trends within urbanization.

Episode 43: Dr. Paul Davidson's view of the history of economic thought

Dr. Davidson is a leader in the post-Keynesian school of thought. Initially, he did not begin his career as an economist, earning a bachelor's degree from Brooklyn College in chemistry and biology. He began graduate school as a biochemistry major but switched to economics. Dr. Davidson finished his master’s at the City University of New York, and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, both in economics. He has held numerous high positions within academia, think tanks, as well as the private sector, and currently holds the Holly Chair of Excellence in Political Economy, Emeritus, at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Dr. Davidson offers a depth of knowledge on subjects such as monetary policy, macroeconomics, global payment systems, and income inequality. He is the founder of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, and the author of 22 books, including "Who’s Afraid of John Maynard Keynes?", "Financial Markets, Money, and the Real World," and many more. Together, we discussed why economists didn’t see the 2007 financial crisis coming, why Hyman Minsky’s theory of boom and bust may have been exaggerated, and the role that savings and investment play within the economy.

Episode 42: The Poisoned Chalice: Dr. Galbraith returns

Dr. Galbraith is a world-renowned economist and son of the famous economist John Kenneth Galbraith. Dr. Galbraith earned his bachelor’s from Harvard and his master’s and Ph.D. from Yale. All in economics. From a young age, James worked within the U.S. Congress working on policy. He eventually worked his way up to the Executive Director of the Joint Economic Committee role. He is also the Lloyd M. Bentsen Chair at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, where he currently teaches. His latest book is titled "Welcome to the Poisoned Chalice: The Destruction of Greece and the Future of Europe." The book is a detailed investigation into the cause of the Greek Debt Crisis and an examination of post-crisis policy. In a series of essays and letters, Dr. Galbraith lays out the meaning of the Greek Debt Crisis and how Greece and the EU can move forward. Together we discussed the tension between national and EU governments, the political fallout caused by the debt crisis, and even brought up one of our favorite guests, Yanis Varoufakis.

Episode 41: Paul Craig Roberts explains the rise of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump

Dr. Roberts served as Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy under the Reagan administration, where he worked on supply-side reforms like the Kemp-Roth bill. Mr. Roberts has taught at many prestigious institutions such as Tulane, Stanford, and Virginia Tech. As a senior researcher at the Hoover Institution, Dr. Roberts eventually earned the William E. Simon Chair in Political Economy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He has dozens of articles appearing in journals such as the Journal of Political Economy, Oxford Economic Papers, and the Journal of Law and Economics. In addition to his journal articles, Dr. Roberts is the author of many books including "How America was Lost" and "The Supply Side Revolution." Together with Dr. Roberts, we discussed current geopolitics, how America lost its competitive advantage, and help explain the rise of global populist movements from both the right and left.

Episode 40: The famous Dr. Galbraith, but maybe not the one you were expecting

Dr. Galbraith is a world-renowned economist and son of the famous economist John Kenneth Galbraith. Dr. Galbraith earned his bachelor’s from Harvard and his master’s and Ph.D. from Yale, all in economics. From a young age, James worked within the U.S Congress working on policy. He eventually worked his way up to the Executive Director of the Joint Economic Committee role. He was the former chair of the board of Economists for Peace and Security, a group of economists focusing on peace and international security. He is the director of the University of Texas Inequality Project and managing editor of "Structural Change and Economic Dynamics." He is also the Lloyd M. Bentsen Chair at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, where he currently teaches. Together, we discussed global inequality, how the ideas of Henry George influenced China, and even debunked the efficient markets hypothesis.

Episode 39: Anwar Shaikh on capitalism

Dr. Shaikh draws from his experience of living in cities across the world including Ankara, Washington D.C., Lagos, New York, and many more. Mr. Shaikh received his bachelor's from Princeton and earned his Ph.D. from Columbia, both in economics. He is the author of "Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises" and "Measuring the Wealth of Nations." He is the author of many journals on topics such as macroeconomics, competition policy, and inequality. Together we discussed the fallacies behind mainstream economic theory, how history and anthropology play a bigger role in economics than we think, and why regulation isn't that useful of a tool for managing the economy.

Episode 38: Lord Adair Turner on the viability of capitalism

Lord Turner is the former Chair of the Energy Transitions Commission, a think tank dedicated to fighting climate change through public policy. He is a senior fellow, and former chair, of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, the organization affiliated with Jayati Ghosh from our previous episode. He has held numerous high positions at multinational corporations such as McKinsey, Chubb, and many more. He has given numerous lectures at prestigious schools such as the London School of Economics and MIT. He is the author of two books: "Economics after the Crisis" and "Between Debt and the Devil." Both are sobering analyses of current macroeconomic trends. We discussed the current state of capitalism, how policy from the ’80s contributes to today’s inequality, and why liberal policies don’t always work the way they are intended.

Episode 37: Scott Baker on how land value taxes can create more equal opportunities for all

Scott Baker is the president of Common Ground-NYC, a Georgist group focusing on social justice and economic equity for all. He is also a blogger for the Huffington Post, as well as the OpEdNews. He has written dozens of articles regarding land speculation and how to improve the real estate market. Together we discussed the economics of real estate, how land value taxes can generate more equal opportunity, and why New York was able to achieve a building boom in the 1920s but not now.

Episode 36: Environment, Ecology, and Economics: a systems approach with Dr. Charles Hall

Dr. Hall received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Colgate University and his master’s in Zoology from Penn State. After learning more about systems ecology in the field, Mr. Hall went on to earn his Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. Dr. Hall has spent his lifetime studying ecology, the environment, and its intersectionality within the economy. He participated in research at illustrious institutions such as the Brookhaven Institute in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Dr. Hall taught at numerous institutions. He is best known for his time at the State University of New York of Environmental Science and Forestry. Together, Dr. Hall and the Henry George School discussed why the mainstream economic framework overlooks environmental degradation, how more people can become aware of climate change, and why economic growth usually leads to pollution.

Episode 35: A talk with America's top Marxist economist

Dr. Wolff is known as America’s top Marxist economist. He earned his bachelor’s in history from Harvard, two master’s degrees in economics and history from Stanford and Yale, and his Ph.D. in economics from Yale University, as well. Dr. Wolff has taught both economics and international affairs for decades. He began his teaching career at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and eventually moved on to the New School. He appears in numerous journals as a critic of conventional capitalism and is a regular contributor to the "Monthly Review." He even has his own radio show where he breaks down current issues through a Marxist lens. Dr. Wolff and the Henry George School discussed post-WWII economic policy, how the US-China relationship affects the global world order, and why real wages stopped growing at a sustainable rate after the 1970s.

Episode 34: Separating growth from development with Dr. Herman Daly

Dr. Daly is a professor emeritus at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy. He received his bachelor’s degree from Rice University in Texas, and his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt. He is known chiefly for his time as a senior economist at the World Bank’s Environment Department. He is the co-founder of the journal of Ecological Economics and has written innumerable journal articles throughout the decades. He is the author of several books including "Toward a Steady-State Economy," "Valuing the Earth," "Ecological Economics and Sustainable Development," and many more. From the start, Dr. Daly has focused on sustainable development, ecological economics, and the role the state plays within the economy. His work has been quite fruitful as it has won him many awards, including Sweden’s Honorary Right Livelihood Award, the Dutch Heineken Prize for Environmental Science, Norway’s Sophie award for sustainable development, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from America’s National Council for Science and the Environment. Dr. Daly and the Henry George School discussed the growing de-growth movement, how societies can develop without harming natural endowments, and how mainstream economic indicators could be rethought to include environmental impact.

Episode 33: Exploring the fallacies of austerity with Dr. Mark Blyth

Dr. Blyth earned his bachelor’s in political science from the University of Strathclyde and went on to earn his master's and Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University. He has taught at multiple prestigious universities across America including Johns Hopkins University and Brown. He is an Eastman Professor at Brown’s Institute for International Studies and is a William R. Rhoades scholar as well. He is the author of several books including "Angrynomics," "Great Transformations," and "Austerity." His recent focus has been austerity: its consequences, benefits, and fallacies. Together, the Henry George School joined Dr. Blyth to discuss the economic impact of austerity measures, its policy origins throughout history, and alternatives to debt reduction.

Episode 32: How Henry George inspired the American progressive movement

Dr. O’Donnell earned his bachelor’s degree from Holy Cross College and his Ph.D. in American history from Columbia. He is currently a history professor at Holy Cross, where he specializes in American and urban history. Dr. O’Donnell is the author of several books including "Henry George and the Crisis of Inequality," "Visions of America," and many more. He has had many appearances on TV and even has his own podcast, "In the Past Lane," where he explores history through interviews and featured pieces. Dr. Lough, who you may remember from our previous episode, earned her Ph.D. from Brandeis University in American history specializing in cultural, political, and social movements. Her dissertation was titled "The Last Tax: Henry George and the Social Politics of Land Reform." Dr. Lough is the former director of the Henry George Birthplace, Archive, and Historical Center. She is the author of "The Annotated Works of Henry George," a commentary on George’s seminal works: "Social Problems" (1883) and "The Condition of Labor" (1891). Together, we discussed Henry George’s political life and mayoral campaign, how George earned his working-class appeal, and how Henry George revolutionized and inspired the American progressive movement.

Episode 31: Dr. Thomas Palley explains how financialization changed capitalism

Dr. Palley earned his bachelor’s degree from Oxford University and both his master’s and Ph.D. in Economics and International Relations from Yale University. Thomas has been featured in numerous prominent journals and has featured in publications such as "The Atlantic Monthly," "American Prospect," and "The Nation." He previously served as Chief Economist for the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, an independent arm of government that analyzes bilateral trade between the US and China. Dr. Palley has authored several books including "Restoring Shared Prosperity," "Financialization," "The Economic Crisis," and "From Financial Crisis to Stagnation." Dr. Palley joined the Henry George School to discuss his vision of periods of American economic history, how the myth of “free markets” precluded the reality of mixed-market economies, and how financialization changes firms’ social behavior.

Episode 30: Analyzing macroeconomic trends with Richard Duncan

Mr. Duncan majored in literature and economics at Vanderbilt University and went on to receive his master's from Babson College in international finance. He was the global head of investment strategy at ABN AMRO Asset Management in London, a financial sector specialist at the World Bank, a consultant for the IMF, and was in charge of equity research at James Capel Securities and Salomon Brothers in Bangkok. Quite the resume to say the least. Richard studies the trends leading up to recent crises and what causes them. He is the author of four books titled "The Dollar Crisis," "The Corruption of Capitalism," "The New Depression," and his latest, "The Money Revolution." In his free time, Mr. Duncan publishes a bi-weekly newsletter called "Macro Watch," which offers analyses of current macroeconomic trends. The Henry George School joined Mr. Duncan to discuss how consumer credit shrank post-WWII debt, how the Federal Reserve dealt with stagflation, and how the US transitioned from a domestic to a global economy and its impacts.

Episode 29: The life and influence of Henry George with Dr. Alexandra W. Lough

Dr. Lough earned her Ph.D. from Brandeis University in American history, specializing in cultural, political, and social movements. Her dissertation was titled "The Last Tax: Henry George and the Social Politics of Land Reform." She is the former director of the Henry George Birthplace, Archive, and Historical Center. She is the author of "The Annotated Works of Henry George," a commentary on George’s seminal works: "Social Problems" (1883) and "The Condition of Labor" (1891). Dr. Lough joined the Henry George School to discuss Henry George's life, how other economists responded to George’s philosophy, and how local decision-makers implemented Georgist ideas into their policy.

Episode 28: Dr. Jayati Ghosh on the global growth of socialist movements

Dr. Ghosh is an Indian economist who specializes in Development Economics. Dr. Ghosh earned her bachelor’s degree from Delhi University and her master’s from Jawaharlal Nehru University, both in economics. She later left India to study at Cambridge University, England, where she wrote a doctoral thesis called "Non-capitalist rent theories and the case of Northern India." She is currently the Chairperson of the Centre for Economic Studies and Planning at Jawaharlal Nehru University, her alma mater. She has taught at numerous universities across India, as well as other prestigious schools such as Tufts and Cambridge University. Dr. Ghosh is the founder of the Economic Research Foundation, a progressive research non-profit focusing on data and econometrics. She is also the Executive Secretary of International Development Economics Associates (IDEAS), a group of economists who critique economic orthodoxy. In addition to publishing multiple scholarly articles, Dr. Ghosh is also an economics columnist for Business Line, Frontline Magazine, and many more. She has worked in numerous government positions across the Indian government focusing on policies concerning welfare, agriculture, and education. Dr. Ghosh joined the Henry George School to discuss the growth of leftist political movements across the world, the Greek Debt Crisis, and what, if anything, the role of the state should be within the economy.

Episode 27: Dr. Ravi Batra on what led to the sky-high inequality we experience today

Dr. Batra attained his bachelor’s degree from Punjab University, his master’s from the Delhi School of Economics, and his Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University, all in Economics. He is currently an Economics professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas and is the author of dozens of published articles in journals such as the American Economic Review, the Journal of the Political Economy, the Journal of Economic Theory, and many more. He is the author of seven books, five of which are New York Times Best Sellers. His most prominent, and the focus of our discussion, is "End Unemployment Now." We were lucky enough to join Dr. Batra in discussing the growth of post-World War II inequality, how the accumulation of debt affects socioeconomic classes differently, and how anti-trust can help working class families.

Episode 26: Jeff Smith on how to enact Georgist policies with sustainable political momentum

Jeff received a linguistics degree from California State University. Mr. Smith is a Georgist scholar and social justice activist who has promoted Georgist policies throughout his career. Mr. Smith is the author of "Counting Bounty," a book that examines the economic value of land and all of the earth’s natural resources. He served as the Director of Education at Basic Economic Education in San Diego and was the Chief Editor at Progress.org, a blog that promotes progressive policy perspectives. Jeff is also known for publishing "The Geonomist," which won a California Greenlight award. He has helped the city of Portland research new transportation policies and is a member of the International Society for Ecological Economics. Mr. Smith joined us to discuss how he helped form the Green Party in California, how progressive activist groups can build sustainable political momentum, and how Universal Basic Income may not be as helpful as some policymakers think.

Episode 25: Helping the planet and reducing inequality through carbon wealth taxes, a discussion

Dr. Semmler earned his doctorate from the Free University of Berlin in Germany. He is the author of several books including "Sustainable Accumulation and Dynamic Portfolio Decisions" and has appeared in numerous economic journals such as the Journal of Applied Econometrics, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organizations, and Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control. Dr. Chappe received her masters in Comparative Business Law and received her Ph.D. in Economics. Mr. Bastos Neves is a current Ph.D. at the New School of Social Research where he focuses on climate change, development finance, and macroeconomics. Together, the three talked about the impacts of carbon taxes, how taxes have impacted inequality, and how private investment patterns have changed throughout the years.

Episode 24: Edward Nell's macroeconomic analysis of the E.U. and the U.S.

Dr. Nell attained his bachelor's from Princeton University with an economics degree and his master's and Ph.D. from Oxford University in England, after being awarded the Rhodes Scholarship. Mr. Nell has taught at numerous universities in the U.S and across the globe including Wesleyan, Bennington College, McGill University, Bard College, and the University of Siena. He has written for many economic journals on topics such as macroeconomic theory, development, and monetary and financial analysis. He is also the author of "The General Theory of Transformational Growth," "Making Sense of a Changing Economy," and many, many more. Together, we listened to Dr. Nell's analysis of the E.U.’s response to the Greek government-debt crisis, why wages haven’t kept up with productivity in advanced economies, and how globalization has negatively impacted the U.S. economy.

Episode 23: The negative impacts of free trade and globalization most economists don't think about

Mr. Tonelson received his bachelor’s degree in history from Princeton University and is currently a Research Fellow at the U.S. Business and Industry Council, a lobbying group that fights for the growth of domestic manufacturing in the United States. He was also a fellow at the Henry Stimson Center and Economic Strategy Institute where he focused on the economic impacts of manufacturing and offshoring. Mr. Tonelson runs his blog RealityChek, which focuses on domestic production, U.S. trade deficits, free trade, and globalization. He is the author of "Race To The Bottom" which examines the role free trade and globalization have on declining wages and global labor standards. Mr. Tonelson talked about the domestic economic impacts of offshoring, protective tariffs, and how free trade helped create the 2007 Financial Crisis.

Episode 22: Debunking mainstream economics with Steve Keen

Dr. Keen is known for his criticisms of orthodox economic thinking and its detachment from reality. Mr. Keen received his bachelor's degree from the University of Sydney. He went on to complete his master's degree and Ph.D. in Economics and Economic History from the University of New South Wales. He is the author of several books on economics, of which the two most famous are "Debunking Economics" and "The New Economics." Both are critiques of modern economic theory that discuss debt deflation and financial instability. Dr. Keen has taught at the University of Western Sydney and Kingston University in London. He briefly worked as a fellow at the Centre for Policy Development in Australia. Dr. Keen has since retired and is now leading the development of a software platform called Minsky, which will be used to create visual models for national economies that are more accurate than previous iterations. Together we discussed the flaws behind the neoclassical economic framework, how human beings’ nature directly contradicts the current philosophical underpinnings in economics, and how firms can get away with charging prices above their marginal costs.

Episode 21: Martin Ford on how artificial intelligence and robotics will change the economy entirely

Martin received his bachelor's degree in Computer Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and his master’s in Business from UCLA. Mr. Ford is a futurist and a New York Times Best Seller. He is the author of four books: The Rule of the Robots, Architects of Intelligence, The Rise of the Robots, and The Lights in the Tunnel. All his books focus on technology, robotics, artificial intelligence, and their socioeconomic impacts. He serves as an artificial intelligence expert and helps to manage Societe Generale’s Rise of the Robots index, a basket of stocks that profits from the growth of AI technology companies. Mr. Ford explained to us the power of technological progress, how information technology can create sustainable prosperity, and how automation will affect employment for both educated and uneducated workers.

Episode 20: Eamonn Fingleton on how deindustrialization and free trade weakened the American economy

Mr. Fingleton graduated from Trinity College in Ireland, where he earned his degree in Economics, Mathematics, and English. Mr. Fingleton worked for over 27 years as a journalist in Tokyo serving as an editor for the Financial Times and Forbes, covering Asia and globalization. Mr. Fingleton is the author of three books: In Praise of Hard Industry, In the Jaws of the Dragon, and Unsustainable. He has been featured in notable publications such as The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Guardian, The Washington Post, and the Harvard Business Review. Together with Mr. Fingleton, we discussed the problems caused by deindustrialization, how free trade can hurt domestic production in the long term, and whether or not free trade is always a good idea.

Episode 19: How property taxes can stop land speculation with Edward J. Dodson

Mr. Dodson attended Shippensburg University and Temple University where he received his economics degree. Mr. Dodson worked for Fannie Mae, a public-private partnership, to help distribute home mortgage loans. During his time at Fannie Mae, Mr. Dodson held numerous management and analyst positions within the Housing & Community Development group, helping grow neighborhoods and local communities. He also has extensive experience as a history lecturer at the Osher Life Long Learning Institute and the Learning is For Everyone program at Burlington County College. Mr. Dodson is the author of a three-volume work titled "The Discovery of First Principles," and many of his articles and papers on diverse subjects have been published in periodicals and journals. In 1997 he founded an online education and research project, the School of Cooperative Individualism.

We were lucky enough to talk with Mr. Dodson about land value taxation, how bad tax policy can incentivize risky speculation, and why the teachings of Henry George are rarely discussed in mainstream economics classes.

Episode 18: Yanis Varoufakis explains his critique of Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century

Dr. Varoufakis is a Greek economist and politician who attained his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Essex in the United Kingdom. Dr. Varoufakis is the founder and secretary-general of the European Realistic Disobedience Front, a progressive leftward party, which is part of the Democracy in Europe Movement 2025. He served as Greek Finance Minister in 2015 and is a current member of the Greek Parliament. Dr. Varoufakis explained his critique of Capital in the 21st Century, by Thomas Piketty, why mainstream economic frameworks ignore inequality, and how Piketty’s solution to alleviating poverty falls short.

Episode 17: Dr. Anwar Shaikh explains the negative impact of free trade most economists miss

Dr. Shaikh draws from his experience of living in cities across the world including Ankara, Washington D.C., Lagos, New York, and more. Mr. Shaikh received his bachelor's degree from Princeton and earned his Ph.D. from Columbia, both in economics. He is the author of Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises and Measuring the Wealth of Nations. He is the author of many journals on topics such as macroeconomics, competition, inequality, and many more. Shaikh discusses the effects of the Bretton Woods agreement, how countries like Japan and South Korea gain a competitive advantage through high productivity and low wages, and the negative impacts of free trade most economists don’t think about.

Episode 16: Learning about different economic systems with Edward Nell

Dr. Nell attained his bachelor's degree from Princeton University in economics and his master's and Ph.D. from Oxford University. Dr. Nell has taught at numerous universities in the U.S. and across the world, including Wesleyan, Bennington College, McGill University, Bard College, and the University of Siena. He has written for many economic journals on topics such as macroeconomic theory, development, and monetary and financial analysis. He is also the author of The General Theory of Transformational Growth, Making Sense of a Changing Economy, and many, many more. Together, with Dr. Nell, we discussed manorialism, different economic systems throughout the centuries, and historical insights offered by Marx and Keynes.

Episode 15: Examining inequality and welfare programs with Dr. Charles Murray

Dr. Murray earned his bachelor's in history from Harvard and attained his Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Murray is a Hayek Chair of Cultural Studies and W.H. Brady scholar at the American Enterprise Institute where he focuses on society, culture, and universal basic income. He is the author of Losing Ground, The Bell Curve, Coming Apart, and Facing Reality. Our discussion with Dr. Murray includes welfare reforms in the 1960s, the inequality between the wealthy and working-class, and how the economic elites in the 1960s differ from modern elites.

Episode 14: Assessing land value with Ted Gwartney

Ted Gwartney was the executive director of the Robert Schalkenbach Foundation, an organization that promotes the ideas of Henry George. He has worked as a land assessor both domestically and internationally, where he learned to optimize land values in order to create robust funding for government projects. Ted has written several pieces on land assessment and real estate policy. Mr. Gwartney joined us to discuss how his experiences in land assessment influenced his Georgist philosophy, land and real estate policy, and how speculation can deter healthy economic growth.

Episode 13: How Dr. Fred Foldvary used Georgist economics to predict the '08 Financial Crisis

Fred Foldvary received his Bachelor's from UC Berkeley and his Master's and Ph.D. in economics from George Mason University. He taught at Virginia Tech, Santa Clara University, and San Jose State. Mr. Foldvary was a research fellow at the Independent Institute and is the author of several books on economics. Dr. Foldvary joins us to discuss his examination of the business cycle and how he predicted the Great Recession, what fuels boom and bust cycles, and how to counteract the negative effects of offshoring.

Episode 12: Is America as economically mobile as it used to be?

Our former president, Andrew Mazzone, was joined by Dr. George R. Tyler to discuss economic mobility in America. Doctor Tyler’s career began as an economic advisor to senators Hubert Humphrey and Lloyd Bentsen. He was appointed to the role of Deputy Treasury Assistant Secretary by Bill Clinton, and in 1995 became a senior official at the World Bank. In 1997, Tyler founded a real estate investment firm to help build homes in Virginia.

Episode 11: Rick Rybeck on funding infrastructure needed for development

Rick Rybeck joins us to discuss Land Value Return and Recycling, an equitable and innovative funding strategy for making our cities resilient and prosperous. Mr. Rybeck received his master's in Real Estate and Urban Development from American University and his JD from the American University Washington College of law. He is the founder and Director of Just Economics LLC, a firm founded in order to guide policy towards helping families. Their goal is to promote job creation, affordable housing, transportation efficiency, and sustainable development.

Episode 10: Patrick Condon explains how we can make urbanization more sustainable

Patrick Condon joins us this week for our discussion on sustainable urban planning. Mr. Condon received his master's in landscape architecture from Umass Amherst and has over 25 years of experience in sustainable urban design. Patrick started his academic career in 1985 at the University of Minnesota before moving to the University of British Columbia in 1992. After acting as the director of the landscape architecture program, he became the James Taylor Chair in Landscape and Liveable Environments. As Chair, he worked to advance sustainable urban design in numerous neighborhoods in the US, Canada, and Australia. Mr. Condon's newest book, Sick City: Disease, Race, Inequality, and Urban Land, features throughout our discussion and is available online. Together we discussed different housing policies across the world, Georgist land taxes, and how cities and towns can become more sustainable.

Episode 9: Robert Chirinko examines the role of state banks within development

Our episode this week comes from our discussion with Robert Chirinko and his examination of state banks within local economies. Together we discussed the trade-offs of state versus national banks, centralization versus decentralization, and a brief history of recent state bank failures. Dr. Chirinko’s research examines business behavior with a focus on capital formation, banking, financial markets, corporate governance and finance, macroeconomics, and tax policy. He received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University and has held faculty positions at Cornell University, the University of Chicago and full-time visiting positions at Stanford University and the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Prior to coming to the University of Illinois at Chicago, he was on the faculty of Emory University where he was the Winship Distinguished Research Professor in the Social Sciences. He is currently a professor in the Finance Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago, a research fellow at the Center for Economic Studies in Munich, and an affiliate and member of the Faculty Advisory Panel for the Government Finance Research Center.

Episode 8: A world without money, interest, or debt with Thomas Greco

In this week's episode, Mr. Thomas Greco helps examine a world without money, interest, or debt. Together, we discussed central banks’ role in the economy, how money and wealth are created, and how we can achieve economic equity and justice. Mr. Greco is a scholar, author, educator, and community economist who has been working at the leading edge of transformational restructuring for more than 35 years. He is widely regarded as a leading authority on moneyless exchange systems, community currencies, financial innovation, community-based economic development, and is a widely sought-after international speaker.

Episode 7: Transitioning to a green economy with Robert Werner

This week we were lucky enough to talk to Robert Werner about a green economy. Mr. Werner talked to us about carbon pricing, carbon dividends, and the economic costs of climate change. Werner earned his degree in Urban Studies from New York University, and since then has joined Citizens Climate Lobby and is New York State Co-coordinator.

Episode 6: Michael Morris introduces the circular economy

Dr. Morris received his doctorate from Liverpool University and later went on to become a post-doctoral fellow at Imperial College in London, before moving to Strathclyde University as a lecturer. He was appointed to a post in Materials Chemistry at UCC in 1993 and, while there, held the Chair of Inorganic Chemistry. We were lucky enough to talk with Dr. Morris about sustainability, the difference between a linear and circular economy, and the history of the circular economy.

Episode 5: Fiscal Policy Reform with Dan Sullivan

In this episode Dan Sullivan examines how our tax systems responded in the light of the pandemic and draws lessons as to how we should raise public revenue for prosperity, sustainability and fiscal resilience. Dan Sullivan is a Georgist scholar, former President of the Council of Georgist Organizations (CGO), and Director of Saving Communities, a Pennsylvania-based association that promotes fiscal integrity and economic justice.

Episode 4: Jack Rasmus on America's healthcare system and lessons from the pandemic

This episode comes from our Annual Conference: Rebuilding the Economy After the Pandemic. The series begins with Dr. Jack Rasmus who spoke to us about the U.S. healthcare system and the COVID-19 pandemic. Together we spoke about the vulnerabilities exposed by the pandemic, how inequality exacerbates these vulnerabilities, and possible reforms to improve the system.

Episode 3: Debate on global economic issues with Yanis Varoufakis and Scott Baker

In this episode, Andrew Mazzone hosts a debate between Yanis Varoufakis and Scott Baker. Dr. Varoufakis is the former Greek Finance Minister and a current member of the Hellenic Parliament. Scott Baker is the President of Common Ground-NYC, and a blogger for the Huffington Post and Oped News. The two discuss the effects of the Bretton Woods Agreement, the post-World War II recovery, economic solutions to a rising China, and the dichotomy of open borders for finance but not humans.

Episode 2: Dr. Paul Craig Roberts discusses the decline of US economy

In this episode, Andrew Mazzone interviews Dr. Paul Craig Roberts and discusses the decline of the U.S. economy. Dr. Roberts talks about the “hubris and arrogance” in Washington, powerful private interest groups that run the country, the effects of off-shoring, and about the declining power of the United States and the dollar.

Episode 1: Dr. Gregory Clark discusses unequal societies

This is an interview with Dr. Gregory Clark, Distinguished Professor of Economics at UC-Davis, and a Visiting Professor in the Economic History Department at LSE.

Dr. Clark is an editor of the European Review of Economic History, chair of the steering committee of the All-UC Group in Economic History, and a Research Associate of the Center for Poverty Research at Davis.

Henry George’s principles. Our society. Your life. Discover it all, free.