Henry George in the 21st Century:

2022 Writing Contests

The 2022 Henry George Writing Contests are intended to encourage students interested in areas such as: monopolies, free trade, land value taxation, social and economic inequality, natural resources, economic rent, corporate welfare (i.e. city development policy, tax abatements, bailouts) and other topics addressed by Henry George.  Paper topics are limited to Henry George and the ideas that he advocated and how they resonate in the 21st Century. It is understood that some of the topics above may be tangential to each other.

The Contests will be open only to:

  • Current college and graduate students
  • High school students

The top 3 essays from each contest will be awarded monetary prizes and will be considered for posting on the Henry George School of Social Science’s website and related social media platforms.

DATES TO REMEMBER: Essay should be submitted no later than August 19, 2022 by 11:59:59 PM EDT. Winners will be announced October 2, 2022.

————————————————–

Click here for more details:

UNIVERSITY

Requirements

  • Papers should provide an in-depth analysis of a current issue concerning monopolies, anti-trust, free trade, land values, or economic and social equality, natural resources, corporate welfare (i.e. city development.) Your chosen topic can be blended with other elements of Henry George’s philosophies, if appropriate. We welcome the submission of papers prepared for course work, but entrants must pay attention to competition details and edit such papers accordingly.
  • Students must register for submission through the online competition portal; all papers must be submitted within the portal.
  • Students will submit an abstract.
  • No author identifying information may be included in the body of the text. The author’s name should only be shared when registering.
  • It is recommended that papers be between 10-25 pages (double spaced, one-inch margins)
  • Papers must be unpublished.

Judging Considerations

  • Depth of analysis
  • Originality and difficulty of topic
  • Quality of thesis/argument
  • Quality of research
  • Conciseness; quality will be valued over quantity
  • Form and quality of citations and sources
  • Conformity with requirements of competition

Students currently enrolled at any of the nation’s accredited universities, as well as current graduate students, are eligible to enter. A committee of Henry George School trustees and staff will judge the papers over the summer, and winners will be announced on October 2nd, Henry George’s birthday.

Winners are awarded:

  • $1,000 for 1st place
  • $750 for 2nd place
  • $500 for 3rd place

Top papers will be considered for posting on the Henry George School of Social Science’s website and social media.

————————————————————————–

HIGH SCHOOL (5-10 pages, double spaced)

Winners are awarded: $550 for first place, $350 for second, and $200 for third. Top papers will be considered for posting on the Henry George School of Social Science’s website and related social platforms.

———————————————————

The competition is now open for submissions through Friday, June 10, 2022. (Or whatever date we select)

SUBMIT HERE (provide the link)

Requirements

·

· Papers should provide an in-depth analysis of a current issue concerning monopolies, anti-trust, free trade, land values, or economic and social equality, natural resources, corporate welfare (i.e. city development.) Your chosen topic can be blended with other elements of Henry George’s philosophies, if appropriate. We welcome the

submission of papers prepared for course work, but entrants must pay attention to competition details and edit such papers accordingly.

· Students must register for submission through the online competition portal; all papers must be submitted within the portal.

· Students will submit an abstract.

· No author identifying information may be included in the body of the text. The author’s name should only be shared when registering.

· It is recommended that papers be between 10-25 pages (double spaced, one-inch margins)

· Papers must be unpublished.

Judging Considerations

· Thoroughness and depth of analysis

· Originality and difficulty of topic

· Quality of thesis/argument

· Quality of research

· Writing style

· Conciseness; quality will be valued over quantity

· Form and quality of citations

· Conformity with requirements of competition

SUBMIT/register? Here

Requirements

  • Papers should provide an in-depth analysis of a current issue concerning monopolies, anti-trust, free trade, land values, or economic and social equality, natural resources, corporate welfare (i.e. city development.) Your chosen topic can be blended with other elements of Henry George’s philosophies, if appropriate. We welcome the submission of papers prepared for course work, but entrants must pay attention to competition details and edit such papers accordingly.
  • Students must register for submission through the online competition portal; all papers must be submitted within the portal.
  • Students will submit an abstract.
  • No author identifying information may be included in the body of the text. The author’s name should only be shared when registering.
  • It is recommended that papers be between 10-25 pages (double spaced, one-inch margins)
  • Papers must be unpublished.

Judging Considerations

  • Depth of analysis
  • Originality and difficulty of topic
  • Quality of thesis/argument
  • Quality of research
  • Conciseness; quality will be valued over quantity
  • Form and quality of citations and sources
  • Conformity with requirements of competition

Jack Rasmus identifies structural flaws in the US healthcare system as revealed during the pandemic and discusses avenues of reform.

Dan Sullivan examines how our tax systems responded in the light of the pandemic and draws lessons as to how we should raise public revenue for prosperity, sustainability and fiscal resilience.

Michael Morris introduces the circular economy, highlighting its role in the fight against climate change and discusses policy tools for making it a reality.

Robert Werner discusses the array of policy options to achieve the transition toward the green economy. He presents his case for carbon pricing.

Thomas Greco offers an evaluation of our existing money system and discusses alternatives for justice, equity and sustainability.

Robert Chirinko discusses the usefulness of state banks as tools of economic development.

Patrick Condon provides a critical assessment of our housing policies, discusses alternative policy options tested around the world and makes the case for a land tax.

Rick Rybeck discusses Land Value Return and Recycling, an equitable and innovative funding strategy for making our cities resilient and prosperous.

SPEAKERS

Dr. Jack Rasmus is a Professor of Economics at Saint Mary’s College in California. He is the author of several books on the US and global economy, including Systemic Fragility in the Global Economy, 2015; Epic Recession: Prelude to Global Depression, 2010, and Obama’s Economy, 2012. His latest book, The Scourge of Neoliberal Economics from Reagan to Trump describes the origins and evolution of Neoliberalism in America. He hosts the weekly New York radio show, Alternative Visions, on the Progressive Radio network. Dr. Rasmus also served as economic advisor to the Green Party’s presidential candidate, Jill Stein. He writes bi-weekly for Latin America’s teleSUR TV, for Z magazine, Znet, and other print & electronic publications.

Mr. Sullivan, is a Georgist scholar, former President of the Council of Georgist Organizations (CGO), and Director of Saving Communities, a Pennsylvania based association that promotes fiscal integrity and economic justice.

Prof. Morris is a graduate of Liverpool University in 1982 (BSc and PhD). He was a post-doctoral fellow at Imperial College in London before moving to Strathclyde University as a lecturer. He then took an ICI endowed lectureship at Cardiff University for research into surface science and catalysis, which was followed by a move to ICI as a research scientist. He was appointed to a post in Materials Chemistry at UCC in 1993 and while there held the Chair of Inorganic Chemistry and was Head of the Department of Chemistry at the university. In 2015, he was appointed Academic Director of AMBER and Professor of Surface and Interface Engineering at the School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin.

Mr. Werner joined Citizens’ Climate Lobby in 2016. He’s been a New York State Co-coordinator and NYC Chapter co-leader for 3 years.

Mr. Greco is a preeminent scholar, author, educator, and community economist, who, for more than 35 years, has been working at the leading edge of transformational restructuring. He is widely regarded as a leading authority on moneyless exchange systems, community currencies, financial innovation, and community economic development, and is a sought after speaker internationally. He has traveled widely in Europe, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas, lecturing, teaching, and advising. He has been a speaker at numerous conferences and has led many workshops and colloquies in 16 countries.

Dr. Chirinko’s research examines business behavior with a focus on capital formation, banking, financial markets, corporate governance and finance, macroeconomics, and tax policy. He has held faculty positions at Cornell University, the University of Chicago, and Emory University, where he was the Winship Distinguished Research Professor in the Social Sciences. He is currently a professor in the Finance Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago, a research fellow at the Center for Economic Studies (Munich), and an affiliate and member of the Faculty Advisory Panel for the Government Finance Research Center (UIC). He has had extended visits to the research departments of several central banks, including appointment as a Houblon-Norman/ George Senior Fellow at the Bank of England.

Mr. Condon has over 25 years of experience in sustainable urban design: first as a professional city planner and then as a teacher and researcher. Patrick started his academic career in 1985 at the University of Minnesota before moving to the University of British Columbia in 1992. After acting as the director of the landscape architecture program, he became the James Taylor Chair in Landscape and Liveable Environments. In that capacity he has worked to advance sustainable urban design in scores of jurisdictions in the US, Canada, and Australia. Patrick has also led the Sustainability by Design project by the Design Centre for Sustainability. For over 20 years, the Design Centre and James Taylor Chair worked on a variety of projects and books to contribute to healthier and more sustainable urban landscapes.

As an attorney with a master’s degree in real estate and urban development, Rick Rybeck’s success in devising and implementing new policy directions lies in his ability to listen and understand stakeholder concerns. Assured that their views and concerns are valued, stakeholders can relinquish their grip on the status quo and collaborate on problem-solving. He uses humor and stories to illustrate economic ideas. This helps people think about old problems in new ways.